Exit:Light

It was after midnight on a Tuesday in October, and we lived in Maine. The house phone rang, and I answered. The call wasn’t for me. It was meant for my father. The call was from the Jackson County, Mississippi sheriff’s department. They told him (me) that my brother, Daniel, had been found dead.

 

I hung up the phone. Ran downstairs. And told my mom.

 

The loss of memories has nothing to do with the memories I can recall, and as a result of my brother’s death I lost a lot of memories. This impermanence of our own memories acts upon the temporary physicality, and semi-permanent visual content of this piece. The purpose of each image is to recreate memories of mine that occurred before and after his death, allowing me the ability to preserve recollections more tangibly through creation and documentation. The structure itself acts as an ephemeral ‘nonument’ that invites the audience to lay with, around and about it while it is still in one piece, providing both a final and provisional resting space.

img_2780_1.jpg
IMG_2716_3.jpg
IMG_2727.JPG
IMG_2793_1.jpg
IMG_2804_1.jpg
IMG_2749_1.jpg
IMG_20180323_1847318.jpg
IMG_20180326_2203506.jpg
IMG_20180323_1852428.jpg
Screen Shot 2018-02-12 at 11.24.10 PM.png
IMG_20180226_1602231.jpg

Peace, Bread, Land and Believe, Obey, Fight

During the height of Russia’s October Revolution, Vladimir Lenin and the Communist Party utilized the slogan “Peace, Land, Bread.” The popular saying served dual purpose as an expression of Communists’ dissatisfaction with the Imperial Russian government and a checklist of necessities that the government should provide its citizens.

Several years later, Benito Mussolini employed the phrase “Believe, Obey, Fight” as a rallying cry for the Italian Youth to proclaim their political faith in Fascism.

Peace, Bread, Land and Believe, Obey, Fight aims to visually compare the theoretical positive and negative impacts of both Communist and Fascist rule. When the similarities between the opposing political ideologies are exploited visually, the viewer is forced to decide which theory belongs to which monitor, and which theory is better suited to their personal preference.

IMG_20180505_1252572.jpg
IMG_20180505_164943_1.jpg
IMG_20180505_164943_2.jpg
IMG_20180505_164943_3.jpg
IMG_20180505_1252477.jpg
IMG_20180505_1253017.jpg
IMG_20180505_1252533.jpg
IMG_20180505_2020330.jpg
IMG_20180505_1253105.jpg
IMG_20180505_2020041.jpg
PANO_20180505_204543.jpg

Devil's Feed(back) (unofficial title)

Drawing inspiration from mirrored “devil’s toy boxes” and the aesthetic quality of cable ghost hunting shows, this installation is intended to push these ideas with the same sense of self voyeurism and the classic vanity to mirrors, cameras and televisions. This was a collaboration with Rian Allen, and Josh McCormick.

IMG_20180305_1551375.jpg
IMG_20180302_190853_054.jpg
IMG_20180302_1548434.jpg

FMJ(TIC) (in progress)

The purpose of this installation is to mock the stereotypical white male within the history of popular culture. The over inflated sense of self, mirrored by the oppressive nature of white bodies on film and television screens is designed to build a generic appeal through violence, supposed “strength,” and lack of outward emotions. Things which according to popular culture have immense value in modern society.


Logan Square Happenings

Documentation for a series of projection based happenings I set up in the spring of 2017. Focusing on the experimentation of ephemerality and site specificity, but purposefully attempting to avoid the eyes of an audience in favor of a visual combination of moving image with urban infrastructure. 

 

P1030541.JPG
P1030536.JPG
P1030539.JPG
P1030557.JPG
P1030569.JPG
P1030579.JPG
P1030596.JPG
P1030602.JPG